UK: Puberty blockers banned even in private clinics. And in France the debate opens
In the UK, private clinics in England or Europe will not accept prescriptions for puberty blockers for minors for three months from 3 June. In Paris the Senate votes on a measure along the same path but the first signatory receives intimidation and threats

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In the UK, private clinics in England or Europe will not accept prescriptions for puberty blockers for minors for three months from 3 June. In Paris the Senate votes on a measure along the same path but the first signatory receives intimidation and threats.

It was one of the last acts of Rishi Sunak's British government before the elections: a measure to prevent that No child or adolescent should be prescribed puberty blockers to treat gender dysphoria. The British National Health Service (NHS) had already banned it the administration of triptorelin after publication last month, of Dr. Hillary Cass' report on gender identity services. But it wasn't enough.

Downing Street considers that to be puberty blockers a real health emergency so much so that, on 29 May, it launched new measures to prevent English children and adolescents from having access to the therapeutic process considered unreliable and harmful by the Cass report.From June 3rd to September 3rd Prescriptions for triptorelin or other similar drugs made by British private doctors or doctors living in the EU or Switzerland will no longer be valid throughout the UK.

Health Minister Victoria Atkins launched this latest tightening after Dr Helen Webberley, who runs the GenderGP offshore clinic, prescribed triptorelin to children as young as ninewithout parental consent to give them “the right puberty” by defining blockers  “safe and lifesaving”.

Meanwhile in France the Senate has approved a bill which calls for restrictions in the use of puberty blockers and bans for minors cross-sex hormones and “sex reassignment” surgery. The bill was approved thanks to the votes of the center-right and center parties and opposed by socialists, greens and progressives who cried transphobia. It is necessary for the project to become law approval by the National Assembly, which at the moment seems rather unlikely, but the political debate on affirmative therapy for minors has finally opened in France too.

Jacqueline Eustache-Brinio, the Republican senator who was the first rapporteur of the bill, explained that its intent is "to prevent minors with dysphoria from finding themselves sorry for medical or surgical treatments undertaken following an incorrect diagnosis" and added that "the text is not transphobic nor does it intend to psychiatrize trans people or deny children's rights." But following the presentation the senator is suffering “attacks by activist associations who act as usual, with intimidation and threats”

In line with the new legislation in the UK and throughout Northern Europe, the bill provides that a minor who wishes to undertake affirmative therapy with puberty blockers must contact to a specialized multidisciplinary center who can evaluate any contraindications and his ability to express consent, and that in any case the treatment is started at least two years from the first appointment with the specialists. And that doctors who do not respect the law are subject to criminal prosecution, with fines of up to 30 thousand euros and a maximum sentence of two years in prison.

Also in France, the persecution by the transactivists of Dora Moutot and Marguerite Stern, young feminist authors of the bestseller Transmania, continues. The two women have been threatened with death for some time and their home address has been published on X. Here Dora Moutot interviewed by Flo Read for UnHerd

 

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