Child rapists: shocking report in the UK
In Great Britain 18 rapes a day are committed by minors on their peers: in 2022 these cases numbered 15,000, almost always by very young males. A British police report shows how free access to violent pornography online is normalizing criminal sexual behavior in England and across other Western countries

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For years we have been reporting the psychological and material damage caused to an entire generation by free access to violent online pornography, consumed by boys and girls starting from the age of 7 but also much earlier: gang rapes committed by minors are only the tip of the scale iceberg of this dramatic phenomenon which has today been analyzed and quantified by a study by the British police.

You can find previous articles on this topic here, here, here, here, here And here.

We were almost the only ones who talked about it continuously.

Hands off women, girls and boys!

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Violent pornography and access to smartphones are turning children into abusers, with more than 6,800 rapes committed in a year by children aged between 10 and 17.

According to National Analysis of Police-Recorded Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation Crimes, in the UK more than half of all sexual crimes committed against minors are currently committed by peers. A real explosion of sexual crimes perpetrated by teenagers.

In addition to the 6,813 rapes in 2022 there were 8,020 sexual assaults and 15,534 cases of indecent images of a child related to the sharing of nude photos.

The police chief who deals with child abuse warned that Sexual violence has become “normalized behavior” for some kids following years of watching hardcore pornography on smartphones.

The data shows that in 2022 52% of the 106,984 child sexual abuse crimes reported to 42 police forces in England and Wales were committed by boys, in what officials called “a growing and worrying trend.” It is a increase in 400% compared to 2013, when child abuse was estimated to account for a third of crimes.

A range of offenses more traditionally associated with predatory adult paedophiles were also recorded, including 6,496 offenses of sexual activity with a child, 225 offenses of sexual solicitation, 62 sexual exploitation offenses and 385 offenses of exposure and voyeurism.

The youngest “sexual offender” reported to police in that 12-month period was a four-year-old boy who uploaded an indecent image of his brother.

The crime wave isn't just fueled by sexting and "exploratory online sexual behavior" among teens going through puberty. The National Analysis of Police-Recorded Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation Crimes report suggests that the growing availability of smartphones has led younger children to commit serious crimes.

Ian Critchley, the police's national lead for protecting and investigating child abuse, said: "I believe this phenomenon is exacerbated by the accessibility of violent pornography, the ease with which it is accessible to children and the perception that it is of normalized behavior." Therefore a person “can carry out the behavior they see online in the most violent way possible even against other peers”.

Critchley insisted that police do not want to criminalize a "generation of young people", adding that officers will not necessarily take action if an underage girl shares an indecent image with her boyfriend. But law enforcement is concerned about the rise in serious sexual crimes often inspired by pornography.

The report states that we live in a time when anyone, at any age, can access harmful and abusive pornography online. The impact on future generations cannot be underestimated: some children are exposed to pornography as early as nine years old.”

Approximately 97% of children aged between 12 and 15 own a smartphone and 83% of children aged between five and seven use a tablet. Analysts found that the average age of the perpetrator of child abuse is 14 and that in cases where the relationship was recorded nine times out of ten the victims knew the abuser.

While the authors' 82% is male The report identified groups of girls under the age of 18 participating in sexual communication crimes and sharing indecent images of children.

Me too'child abuse within the family it remains a common form of reported abuse and accounts for approximately 33% of crimes. Wendy Hart, deputy director for child sexual abuse at the National Crime Agency, said: “This report shows that the scale of child sexual abuse continues to increase. Highlights what it is about a largely hidden crime“.

translation and adaptation by Mara Accettura

original article here


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